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Principles of Physics

For Scientists and Engineers

; John O. Rasmussen

This textbook presents a basic undergraduate course in physics covering all essential aspects of mechanics, mechanical properties of matter, thermal properties of matter, elementary thermodynamics, electrodynamics, electricity, magnetism, light, optics and sound. Les mer
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Vår pris: 1856,-

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*Vi bestiller varen fra forlag i utlandet. Dersom varen finnes, sender vi den så snart vi får den til lager
På grunn av Brexit-tilpasninger og tiltak for å begrense covid-19 kan det dessverre oppstå forsinket levering.

Om boka

This textbook presents a basic undergraduate course in physics covering all essential aspects of mechanics, mechanical properties of matter, thermal properties of matter, elementary thermodynamics, electrodynamics, electricity, magnetism, light, optics and sound. It includes simple mathematical approaches to each physical principle, with carefully selected examples and exercises supporting each chapter.




This second edition of a widely popular textbook - boasting close to 6 million downloads - adds many new exercises and solutions, a new summary for each chapter, boxed features separating the examples from the text, and highlights fundamental physical outcomes and rules. The appendices provide a quick and helpful point of reference for all fundamental conversion factors and basic formulas, as well as rules for differentiation and integration, helping students to understand the elementary mathematical steps used for solving the examples and exercises. Visually impressive and full of real-word examples with step-by-step solutions, this textbook is an indispensable tool for both instructors and students seeking direct access to a broad spectrum of physics.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

PART 1: FUNDAMENTAL BASICS







CHAPTER 1: DIMENSIONS AND UNITS











1-1 The International System of Units



1-2 Standards of Length, Time, and Mass



1-3 Dimensional analysis



1-4 Significant Figures



1-5 Estimation and Order of Magnitude



Summary



1-6 Exercises







CHAPTER 2: VECTORS



2-1 Vectors and Scalars



2-2 Properties of Vectors



2-3 Vector Components and Unit Vectors



2-4 Multiplying Vectors



Summary



2-5 Exercises







PART 2: MECHANICS



CHAPTER 3: MOTION IN ONE DIMENSION



3-1 Position and Displacement



3-2 Average Velocity and Average Speed



3-3 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed



3-4 Acceleration



3-5 Constant Acceleration



3-6 Free Fall



Summary



3-7 Exercises







CHAPTER 4: MOTION IN TWO DIMENSIONS



4-1 Position, Displacement, Velocity, and Acceleration Vectors



4-2 Projectile Motion



4-3 Uniform Circular Motion



4-4 Tangential and Radial Acceleration



4-5 Non-uniform Circular Motion



Summary



4-6 Exercises







CHAPTER 5: FORCE AND MOTION



5-1 The Cause of Acceleration and Newton's Laws



5-2 Some Particular Forces



5-3 Applications to Newton's Laws



Summary



5-4 Exercises







CHAPTER 6: WORK, ENERGY, AND POWER



6-1 Work Done by a Constant Force



6-2 Work Done by a Variable Force



6-3 Work-Energy Theorem



6-4 Conservative Forces and Potential Energy



6-5 Conservation of Mechanical Energy



6-6 Work Done by Non-conservative forces



6-7 Conservation of Energy



6-8 Power



Summary



6-9 Exercises







CHAPTER 7: LINEAR MOMENTUM, COLLISION, AND CENTER OF MASS



7-1 Linear Momentum and Impulse



7-2 Conservation of Linear Momentum



7-3 Conservation of Momentum and Energy in Collisions



7-3-1 Elastic Collisions in One and Two Dimensions



7-3-2 Inelastic Collisions, Center of Mass (CM)



7-5 Dynamics of the Center of Mass



7-6 Systems of Variable Mass



7-6-1 Systems of Increasing Mass



7-6-2 Systems of Decreasing Mass; Rocket Propulsion



Summary



7-7 Exercises 200







CHAPTER 8: ROTATIONAL MOTION



8-1 Radian Measures



8-2 Rotational Kinematics; Angular Quantities



8-3 Constant Angular Acceleration



8-4 Angular Vectors



8-5 Relating Angular and Linear Quantities



8-6 Rotational Dynamics; Torque



8-7 Newton's Second Law for Rotation



8-8 Kinetic Energy, Work, and Power in Rotation



8-9 Rolling Motion



Summary



8-10 Exercises







CHAPTER 9: ANGULAR MOMENTUM



9-1 Angular Momentum of Rotating Systems



9-1-1 Angular Momentum of a Particles



9-1-2 Angular Momentum of a System of Particles



9-1-3 Angular Momentum of a Rotating Rigid Body



9-2 Conservation of Angular Momentum



9-3 The Spinning Top and Gyroscope



Summary



9-4 Exercises







CHAPTER 10: MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATTER



10-1 Density and Relative Density



10-2 Elastic Properties of Solids



10-2-1 Young's Modulus: Elasticity in Length



10-2-2 Shear Modulus: Elasticity of Shape



10-2-3 Bulk Modulus: Volume Elasticity



10-3 Fluids



10-4 Fluid Statics



10-5 Fluid Dynamics



Summary



10-6 Exercises











PART 3: INTODUCTORY THERMODYNAMICS



CHAPTER 11: THERMAL PROPERTIES OF MATTER



11-1 Temperature



11-2 Thermal Expansion of Solids and Liquids



11-2-1 Linear Expansion



11-2-2 Volume Expansion



11-3 The Ideal Gas



Summary



11-4 Exercises







CHAPTER 12: HEAT AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS



12-1 Heat and Thermal Energy



12-1-1 Units of Heat-The Mechanical Equivalent of Heat



12-1-2 Heat Capacity and Specific Heat



12-1-3 Latent Heat



12-2 Heat and Work



12-3 The First Law of Thermodynamics



12-4 Applications of the First Law of Thermodynamics



12-5 Heat Transfer



Summary



12-6 Exercises







CHAPTER 13: KINETIC THEORY OF GASES



13-1 Microscopic Model of an Ideal Gas



13-2 Molar Specific Heat Capacity of an Ideal Gas



13-2-1 Molar Specific Heat at Constant Volume



13-2-2 Molar Specific Heat at Constant Pressure



13-3 Distribution of Molecular Speeds



13-4 Non-ideal Gasses and Phases of Matter



Summary



13-3 Exercises







PART 4: SOUND AND LIGHT WAVES



CHAPTER 14: OSCILLATIONS AND WAVE MOTION



14-1 Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM)



14-1-1 Velocity and Acceleration of SHM



14-1-2 The Force Law for SHM



14-1-3 Energy of the Simple Harmonic Oscillator



14-2 Damped Simple Harmonic Motion



14-3 Sinusoidal Waves



14-3-1 Transverse and Longitudinal Waves



14-3-2 Wave length and Frequency



14-3-3 Harmonic Waves: Simple Harmonic Motion



14-4 The Speed of Waves on Strings



14-5 Energy Transfer by Sinusoidal Waves on Strings



14-6 The Linear Wave Equation



14-7 Standing Waves



14-7-1 Reflection at a Boundary



14-7-2 Standing Waves and Resonance



Summary



14-8 Exercises







CHAPTER 15: SOUND WAVES



15-1 Speed of Sound Waves



15-2 Periodic Sound Waves



15-3 Energy, Power, and Intensity of Sound Waves



15-4 The Decibel Scale



15-5 Hearing Response to Intensity and Frequency



15-6 The Doppler Effect



15-7 Supersonic Speeds and Shock Waves



Summary



15-8 Exercises







CHAPTER 16: SUPERPOSITION OF SOUND WAVES



16-1 Superposition and Interference



16-2 Spatial Interference of Sound Waves



16-3 Standing Sound Waves



16-4 Standing Sound Waves in Air columns



16-5 Temporal Interference of Sound Waves: Beats



Summary



16-6 Exercises







CHAPTER 17: LIGHT WAVES AND OPTICS



17-1 Light Rays



17-2 Reflection and Refraction of Light



17-3 Total Internal Reflection and Optical Fibers



17-4 Chromatic Dispersion and Prisms



17-5 Formation of Images by Reflection



17-5-1 Plane Mirrors



17-5-2 Spherical Mirrors



17-5-2-1 Concave Mirrors



17-5-2-2 Convex Mirrors



17-6 Formation of Images by Refraction



17-6-1 Spherical Refracting Surfaces



17-6-2 Flat Refracting Surfaces



17-6-3 Thin Lenses



Summary



17-7 Exercises







CHAPTER 18: INTERFERENCE, DIFFRACTION, AND POLARIZATION OF LIGHT



18-1 Interference of Light Waves



18-2 Young's Double-Slit Experiment



18-3 Thin Films - Change of Phase due to Reflection



18-4 Diffraction of Light Waves



18-5 Diffraction Gratings



18-6 Polarization of Light Waves



Summary



18-7 Exercises







PART 5: ELECTRICITY



CHAPTER 19: ELECTRIC FORCE



19-1 Electric Charge



19-2 Charging Conductors and Insulators



19-3 Coulomb's Law



Summary



19-4 Exercises







CHAPTER 20: ELECTRIC FIELDS



20-1 The Electric Field



20-2 The Electric Field of a point charge



20-3 The Electric Field of an Electric Dipole



20-4 Electric Field of a Continuous Charge Distribution



20-4-1 The Electric Field due to a Charged Rod



20-4-2 The Electric Field of a Uniformly Charged Arc



20-4-3 The Electric Field of a Uniformly Charged Ring



20-4-4 The Electric Field of a Uniformly Charged Disk



20-5 Electric Field Lines



20-6 Motion of Charged particles in a Uniform Electric Field



Summary



20-7 Exercises







CHAPTER 21: GAUSS'S LAW



21-1 Electric Flux



21-2 Gauss's Law



21-3 Applications of Gauss's Law



21-4 Conductors in Electrostatic Equilibrium



21-5 Exercises







CHAPTER 22: ELECTRIC POTENTIAL



22-1 Electric Potential Energy



22-2 Electric Potential



22-3 Electric Potential in a uniform Electric Field



22-4 Electric Potential Due to a Point Charge



22-5 Electric Potential Due to a Dipole



22-6 Electric Dipole in an External Electric Field



22-7 Electric Potential Due to a Charged Rod



22-8 Electric Potential Due to a Uniformly Charged Arc



22-9 Electric Potential Due to a Uniformly Charged Ring



22-10 Electric Potential Due to a Uniformly Charged Disk



22-11 Potential Due to a Uniformly Charged Sphere



22-12 Electric Potential Due to a Charged Conductor



22-13 Potential Gradient



22-14 The Electrostatic Precipitator



22-15 The Van De Graaff Generator



Summary



22-16 Exercises







CHAPTER 23: CAPACITORS AND CAPACITANCE



23-1 Capacitor and Capacitance



23-2 Calculating Capacitance



23-3 Capacitors with Dielectrics



23-4 Capacitors in Parallel and Series



23-5 Energy Stored in a Charged Capacitor



Summary



23-6 Exercises







CHAPTER 24: ELECTRIC CIRCUITS



24-1 Electric Current and Electric Current Density



24-2 Ohm's Law and Electric Resistance



24-3 Electric Power



24-4 Electromotive Force



24-5 Resistors in Series and Parallel



24-6 Kirchhoff's Rules



24-7 The RC Circuit



Summary



24-8 Exercises







PART 6: MAGNETISM



CHAPTER 25: MAGNETIC FIELDS



25-1 Magnetic Force on a Moving Charge



25-2 Motion of a Charged Particle in a Uniform Magnetic Field



25-3 Charged Particles in an Electric and Magnetic Fields



25-3-1 Velocity Selector



25-3-2 The Mass Spectrometer



25-3-3 The Hall Effect



25-4 Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Conductor



25-5 Torque on a Current Loop



25-5-1 Electric Motors



25-5-2 Galvanometers



25-6 Non-uniform Magnetic Fields



Summary



25-7 Exercises







CHAPTER 26: SOURCES OF MAGNETIC FIELD



26-1 The Biot-Savart Law



26-2 The Magnetic Force Between Two Parallel Currents



26-3 Ampere's Law



26-4 Displacement Current and the Ampere-Maxwell Law



26-5 Gauss's Law for Magnetism



26-6 The Origin of Magnetism



26-7 Magnetic Materials



26-8 Diamagnetism and Paramagnetism



26-9 Ferromagnetism



26-10 Some Applications of Magnetism



Summary



26-11 Exercises







CHAPTER 27: FARADAY'S LAW, ALTERNATING CURRENT, AND MAXWELL'S EQUATIONS



27-1 Faraday's Law of Induction



27-2 Motional emf



27-3 Electric Generators



27-4 Alternating Current



27-5 Transformers



27-6 Induced Electric Fields



27-7 Maxwell's Equations of Electromagnetism



27-8 Exercises







CHAPTER 28: INDUCTANCE, OSCILLATING CIRCUITS, AND AC CIRCUITS



28-1 Self-Inductance



28-2 Mutual Inductance



28-3 Energy Stored in an Inductor



28-4 The L-R Circuit



28-5 The Oscillating L-C Circuit



28-6 The L-R-C Circui



28-7 Circuits with an ac Source



28-8 L-R-C Series in an ac Circuit



28-9 Resonance in L-R-C Series Circuits



Summary



28-10 Exercises







CHAPTER 29: Universal Gravitation



27-1 Universal Newtonian Law



27-2 Measuring the Gravitational Constant



27-3 Gravitational Force and the Free-Fall Acceleration



27-4 Kepler's Laws and the Motion of Planets



27-5 The Gravitational Field and the Gravitational Potential Energy



27-6 Energy Considerations in Planetary and Satellite Motion



Summary



27-7 Exercises



APPENDICES



A Conversion Factors



B Basic Rules and Formulas



C The Periodic Table of Elements







ANSWERS TO ALL EXERCISES







INDEX







Om forfatteren

Prof. Hafez A. Radi obtained his B.Sc. degree in Special Physics with distinction and highest class honors from Ain-Shams University in June 1967. He also obtained M. Sc. degree in theoretical atomic Physics from the same university in 1970. Then he moved to Kuwait University as a demonstrator and got his Ph. D. degree in theoretical Atomic Physics from the same University in 1974. He was promoted to Associate Professor Rank in 1979 and full Professor Rank in 1984. He visited the International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy (from June to August, 1975). For the last 44 years he has been working with research scientists in Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. On leave of absence from Department of Physics, Kuwait University, he spent his Sabbatical leave (from January 1981 to January 1982) and visited the Lab 15 times (each for a period of about two month). As a visiting professor, he also spent two research months (starting from June 1979) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory and University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37916, USA. After the Gulf war in 1990, he moved to King Abdul Aziz University (KAAU), Madinah Branch, SA (1990 - 2004) and Taibah University. He has been the Chairman of Physics and Mathematics Department at KAAU for one year. He moved to MSA University in Egypt in 2005 and appointed as the head of physics department from 2007 to 2012 and then as the head of the General Systems Engineering Department from 2012 to present. He published many articles as a leading author in distinguished international Journals such as Physical Review Letters, Physical Review A, Physical Review C, Journal of Physics (Atoms and Molecules), etc. He taught many undergraduate and Graduate courses in Physics, Mathematical Physics, and applications of Physics. He attended many international Conferences in Atomic and Nuclear Physics.




Prof. em. John O. Rasmussen, born 1926; B.S. California Institute of Technology (1948); Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley (1952); M.A. (hon) Yale (1969); Visiting Research Professor, Nobel Institute for Physics, Stockholm (1953); N.S.F. Senior Postdoctoral Fellow, Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen (1961-62); E.O. Lawrence Award (1967); Professor and Associate Director, Heavy Ion Accelerator Laboratory, Yale University (1969-72); Honorary Professor Fudan University, Shanghai (1984); J.S. Guggenheim Fellow (1972); von Humboldt Senior Fellowship, Munich (1991); A.C.S. Award for Nuclear Applications in Chemistry (1976); Fellow AAAS, Member ACS, APS, FAS; Faculty Senior Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He published 386 articles in distinguished international Journals such as Physical Review Letters, Physical Review C etc. with more than 4668 citations.