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Seeking the Right to Food - 
      Bright Nkrumah

Seeking the Right to Food

Food Activism in South Africa

Despite a constitutional right to food, a comprehensive social security structure, being a net exporter of agricultural products and maintaining a rising GDP, freedom from hunger remains a pipedream for millions of South Africans. Les mer
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Paperback
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Paperback
Legg i
Vår pris: 310,-

(Paperback) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 7 virkedager

Despite a constitutional right to food, a comprehensive social security structure, being a net exporter of agricultural products and maintaining a rising GDP, freedom from hunger remains a pipedream for millions of South Africans. With a constant surge in food prices, the availability of sustenance is often seriously threatened for all of South Africa's population. While the underprivileged majority residing in townships often demonstrate their discontent for poor service delivery on the streets, they rarely channel this strategy into taming food inflation. This study seeks to understand this irony and examine ways in which this trend could be reversed. Proposing a compelling argument for food activism, Bright Nkrumah suggests ways of mobilising disempowered groups to reclaim this inherent right. Presented alongside historical and contemporary case studies to illustrate the dynamics of collective action and food security in South Africa, he draws from legal, social and political theory to make the case for 'activism' as a force for alleviating food insecurity.
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Utgitt:
Forlag: Cambridge University Press
Innbinding: Paperback
Språk: Engelsk
ISBN: 9781009011174
Format: 23 x 15 cm
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1. Food activism and policy in South Africa; 2. A tale of food activism; 3. The case of Right to Food Campaign; 4. Rocking the boat? Mobilising for food security in South Africa; 5. Food (in)security and legal implications in South Africa; 6. The unfinished agenda: perspectives on South Africa's food (in)security; 7. Dispossession: reforming land in South Africa; 8. Ethical obligation to assist impoverished South Africans; 9. What is to be done: overcoming policy fragmentation in South Africa; Conclusion.
Bright Nkrumah is affiliated with the Global Change Institute at the University of the Witwatersrand. He received his DPhil from the Center for Human Rights, University of Pretoria and has published extensively on political contestation, minority rights, food (in)security, urban agriculture and democratisation.