Meny

The Open Mobile Alliance

Delivering Service Enablers for Next-Generation Applications

; Musa Unmehopa
























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Trademarks and Permissionv
Dedicationvii
Forewordxxi
Prefacexxiii
Who Should Read This Book?xxiv
What to Cover?xxiv
A Word on Timingxxiv
A Disclaimerxxv
Acknowledgementsxxvii
About the Authorsxxix




List of Figures

xxxiii




Part I Background and Introduction

1(60)




Introduction

3(4)




Service Enablers

3(1)




The Open Mobile Alliance (OMA)

4(1)




Service Enablers in OMA

5(2)




The Silo Syndrome and its Solution

7(14)




Vertical Integration

7(2)




Re-use as First-Class Citizen

9(4)




Service Enablers

10(1)




Interfaces

11(1)




Some Examples Using Interfaces

12(1)




Resources

13(1)




The OSE

13(5)




Policy Enforcer

14(1)




OSE Interface Categories

15(2)




Protocol Bindings

17(1)




Putting the Piece Parts Together

17(1)




What the OSE Isn't

18(1)




Additional Features of the OSE

18(1)




Protection of Resources

18(1)




End-user Experience

18(1)




OSE and Related Technologies

19(1)




Summary

19(2)




The Open Mobile Alliance - An Organizational Overview

21(20)




Overview of the OMA

21(2)




Affiliation - A Historic Perspective

22(1)




Principles of the OMA

23(1)




The OMA's Relationship with External Organizations

23(1)




OMA Organizational Structure

24(9)




OMA Board of Directors

25(1)




Technical Plenary

25(1)




OMA Committees

26(1)




OMA Horizontal Working Groups

27(1)




OMA Vertical Working Groups

28(5)




OMA Birds of a Feather Groups

33(1)




The Processes

33(2)




Smooth Sailing, no Waterfalls or Gates

33(1)




Support for Off-line Progress and Decision Making

34(1)




Strive for Consensus

34(1)




Low Threshold for New Work

34(1)




Enabler Release Program

34(1)




Interoperability in the Open Mobile Alliance

35(5)




The Objectives of the OMA IOP

36(1)




Process and Documentation

37(2)




OMA Interoperability Recognition Program

39(1)




Summary

40(1)




Interoperability TestFests

41(6)




The Objective of Interoperability in the OMA

41(1)




The Organization of the Test Campaigns

42(1)




Planning

43(1)




Finances

44(1)




TestFest Statistics

44(1)




Comparison with Other Standards Development Organizations (SDOs)

44(1)




Summary

45(2)




Service Provider - The Network Operator Perspective

47(10)




The Need for OMA

47(3)




Operators in the OMA

50(3)




OMA Challenges for the Future

53(2)




Summary

55(2)




Service Provider - The Enterprise Perspective

57(4)




Enterprise Needs

57(2)




OMA Enterprise Awareness

59(1)




Summary

60(1)




Part II Horizontal Topics

61(132)




The Policy Enforcer Details: Model, Architecture, Realization, and Impact

63(14)




Policy Enforcement Modeling in the OSE

63(2)




Beyond the OSE: Policy Enforcement as Service Oriented Architecture Composition

65(3)




Logical Architecture versus Deployment Considerations

68(1)




Relationship to Parlay and IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS)

68(1)




Policy Modeling

69(1)




Policy Enforcer through OMA Enabler Realization

69(2)




Relationship of Policy Enforcer to IETF PEP/PDP

71(1)




Policy Assembly, Composition, and Orchestration

71(4)




Model and PEL Assembly

71(1)




Usage Considerations

72(1)




Policies in Service Provider Domain

73(2)




Summary - Next Steps

75(2)




The Policy Evaluation, Enforcement, and Management Enabler

77(38)




Are Those Specifications Really Needed?

78(4)




Policy Control and Management Overview

79(1)




Standards Precursors to PEEM

80(2)




What Roles Are the PEEM Specifications Playing?

82(1)




PEEM Market Needs

82(7)




Use Case for Explicit Requests to PEEM

83(1)




Use Case for Intercepted Requests by PEEM

84(2)




PEEM Requirements

86(3)




PEEM Architecture and Technical Specifications

89(10)




PEEM in the OSE

89(1)




PEEM Logical Architecture

90(3)




Logical Flows for PEEM

93(1)




PEEM Policy Expression Language Details

94(2)




PEM-1 Interface Details

96(2)




PEM-2 Interface Specification

98(1)




PEEM Salient Points

99(8)




Usage Patterns

99(4)




Expert Topics for PEL

103(1)




Expert Topics for PEM-1

104(1)




Divergent Views and their Resolution

105(2)




Impact of Specifications on the Industry

107(5)




Impact on Service Providers

108(1)




Impact on Vendors

109(1)




Impact on Consumer Market

110(1)




Impact on Corporate Market

111(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

112(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

112(1)




Summary

113(2)




Utilization of IMS in OMA

115(10)




Are Those Specifications Really Needed?

116(1)




Standard Precursors to IMSinOMA

117(1)




Architecture Overview

117(3)




Salient Points and Divergent Views

120(2)




Impact of Specifications

122(1)




Impact on the Industry

122(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

122(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

123(1)




Summary

123(2)




Service Architectures - Parlay and the OSE

125(10)




A Quick Taster of Parlay

125(3)




Parlay X

126(2)




The Parlay in OSE Enabler

128(3)




Parlay as Network Resource

129(1)




Parlay X Web Service as the Enabler

129(1)




Parlay Service Capability Feature as the Enabler

130(1)




Hybrid Parlay and OMA Solution

130(1)




PIOSE Challenges

131(2)




Enforcing Service Provider Policies

131(1)




The Parlay Policy Management Service Capability Feature

132(1)




Impact of Specifications on the Industry

133(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

133(1)




Summary

133(2)




A Web Services Technology Realization of the OSE

135(24)




Web Services Crash Course

136(1)




A Web Services Infrastructure Framework

137(2)




Mobile Web Services

139(1)




The Mobile Network as Content Source for the Web Service

139(1)




The Mobile Device as Web Service Requestor

139(1)




The Mobile Device as Web Service Provider

140(1)




The OMA Web Services Enabler Release

140(2)




The Technologies Specified by OWSER

142(4)




Transport

142(1)




Messaging

143(1)




Description

144(1)




Quality of Service

145(1)




Components

145(1)




Discovery

146(1)




Network Identity

146(7)




Identity Management Concepts Overview

146(2)




Identity Provider Introduction

148(1)




Identity Federation and Single Sign-On

149(1)




Name Registration

149(1)




Authentication Context

150(1)




Single Sign-Out

150(1)




Federation Termination Notification

150(1)




Attribute Query and/or Modification

150(1)




Usage Directive

151(1)




Interaction Service

151(1)




Bootstrapping Identity based Web Services Framework

151(1)




Discovery Service

151(1)




Liberty enabled User Agent

152(1)




Security

152(1)




Network Identity Conclusions

152(1)




OWSER and the OSE

153(1)




Divergent Views and their Resolution

154(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

154(3)




Web Services on Devices

155(1)




XML Usage Guide

155(1)




Common XML Dictionary

155(1)




Additional WS-I Profiles

155(1)




Other Industry Profiles

156(1)




Impact of the Specifications

157(1)




Impact on the Industry

157(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

157(1)




Summary

157(2)




The OMA Service Provider Environment Enabler

159(18)




Are Those Specifications Really Needed?

160(1)




OSPE Use Cases

161(2)




OSPE Requirements

163(1)




Standard Precursors to OSPE

164(3)




OAM & P Standards in the Telecommunications Industry

164(1)




OAM & P Standards in the It Industry

165(2)




OSPE Architecture and Technical Specifications

167(5)




OSPE Enabler in the OSE

167(1)




OSPE Logical Architecture

168(1)




OSPE Logical Flows

169(3)




OSPE Salient Points

172(1)




Impact of Specifications on the Industry

173(2)




Impact on Service Providers

174(1)




Impact on Vendors

174(1)




Impact on Consumer Market

174(1)




Impact on Corporate Market

175(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

175(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

175(1)




Summary

175(2)




The Security Enablers

177(16)




Are Those Specifications Really Needed?

179(1)




Wireless Public Key Infrastructure

180(1)




On-board Key Generation (OBKG)

180(1)




Online Certificate Status Protocol Mobile Profile

180(1)




Smart Card Web Server (SCWS)

180(1)




Security Common Functions Enabler

180(8)




SEC-CF Use Case

181(1)




Security Common Functions Requirements

182(1)




Standards Precursors to Security Common Functions

182(1)




SEC-CF Architecture and Technical Specifications

182(4)




SEC-CF Technical Specifications

186(2)




SEC-CF Salient Points

188(1)




Divergent Views and their Resolution

189(1)




Impact of Specifications on the Industry

189(3)




Impact on Service Providers

190(1)




Impact on Vendors

190(1)




Impact on Consumer Market

191(1)




Impact on Corporate Market

191(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

191(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

192(1)




Summary

192(1)




Part III Selected OMA Service Enablers

193(234)




The Presence and List Management Enablers

195(22)




Presence - What is it?

195(1)




A Constructionist View of Presence Architectures

196(9)




Basic Elements

196(1)




Presence Service Interfaces and the Resource List Server

197(1)




Presence Authorization Policies

198(1)




Presence-related Event Packages

199(1)




Presence Optimizations

199(1)




Presence Standards

200(1)




The `Three-Layer Brick'Model

200(1)




The IETF Presence Model and Standards

201(1)




A Summary of IETF Presence Standards

202(1)




The 3GPP2 Presence Model and Standard

202(1)




The 3GPP Presence Model and Standards

203(1)




The OSA PAM SCF Model

204(1)




The OMA Presence Model and Specifications

205(8)


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Trademarks and Permissionv
Dedicationvii
Forewordxxi
Prefacexxiii
Who Should Read This Book?xxiv
What to Cover?xxiv
A Word on Timingxxiv
A Disclaimerxxv
Acknowledgementsxxvii
About the Authorsxxix




List of Figures

xxxiii




Part I Background and Introduction

1(60)




Introduction

3(4)




Service Enablers

3(1)




The Open Mobile Alliance (OMA)

4(1)




Service Enablers in OMA

5(2)




The Silo Syndrome and its Solution

7(14)




Vertical Integration

7(2)




Re-use as First-Class Citizen

9(4)




Service Enablers

10(1)




Interfaces

11(1)




Some Examples Using Interfaces

12(1)




Resources

13(1)




The OSE

13(5)




Policy Enforcer

14(1)




OSE Interface Categories

15(2)




Protocol Bindings

17(1)




Putting the Piece Parts Together

17(1)




What the OSE Isn't

18(1)




Additional Features of the OSE

18(1)




Protection of Resources

18(1)




End-user Experience

18(1)




OSE and Related Technologies

19(1)




Summary

19(2)




The Open Mobile Alliance - An Organizational Overview

21(20)




Overview of the OMA

21(2)




Affiliation - A Historic Perspective

22(1)




Principles of the OMA

23(1)




The OMA's Relationship with External Organizations

23(1)




OMA Organizational Structure

24(9)




OMA Board of Directors

25(1)




Technical Plenary

25(1)




OMA Committees

26(1)




OMA Horizontal Working Groups

27(1)




OMA Vertical Working Groups

28(5)




OMA Birds of a Feather Groups

33(1)




The Processes

33(2)




Smooth Sailing, no Waterfalls or Gates

33(1)




Support for Off-line Progress and Decision Making

34(1)




Strive for Consensus

34(1)




Low Threshold for New Work

34(1)




Enabler Release Program

34(1)




Interoperability in the Open Mobile Alliance

35(5)




The Objectives of the OMA IOP

36(1)




Process and Documentation

37(2)




OMA Interoperability Recognition Program

39(1)




Summary

40(1)




Interoperability TestFests

41(6)




The Objective of Interoperability in the OMA

41(1)




The Organization of the Test Campaigns

42(1)




Planning

43(1)




Finances

44(1)




TestFest Statistics

44(1)




Comparison with Other Standards Development Organizations (SDOs)

44(1)




Summary

45(2)




Service Provider - The Network Operator Perspective

47(10)




The Need for OMA

47(3)




Operators in the OMA

50(3)




OMA Challenges for the Future

53(2)




Summary

55(2)




Service Provider - The Enterprise Perspective

57(4)




Enterprise Needs

57(2)




OMA Enterprise Awareness

59(1)




Summary

60(1)




Part II Horizontal Topics

61(132)




The Policy Enforcer Details: Model, Architecture, Realization, and Impact

63(14)




Policy Enforcement Modeling in the OSE

63(2)




Beyond the OSE: Policy Enforcement as Service Oriented Architecture Composition

65(3)




Logical Architecture versus Deployment Considerations

68(1)




Relationship to Parlay and IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS)

68(1)




Policy Modeling

69(1)




Policy Enforcer through OMA Enabler Realization

69(2)




Relationship of Policy Enforcer to IETF PEP/PDP

71(1)




Policy Assembly, Composition, and Orchestration

71(4)




Model and PEL Assembly

71(1)




Usage Considerations

72(1)




Policies in Service Provider Domain

73(2)




Summary - Next Steps

75(2)




The Policy Evaluation, Enforcement, and Management Enabler

77(38)




Are Those Specifications Really Needed?

78(4)




Policy Control and Management Overview

79(1)




Standards Precursors to PEEM

80(2)




What Roles Are the PEEM Specifications Playing?

82(1)




PEEM Market Needs

82(7)




Use Case for Explicit Requests to PEEM

83(1)




Use Case for Intercepted Requests by PEEM

84(2)




PEEM Requirements

86(3)




PEEM Architecture and Technical Specifications

89(10)




PEEM in the OSE

89(1)




PEEM Logical Architecture

90(3)




Logical Flows for PEEM

93(1)




PEEM Policy Expression Language Details

94(2)




PEM-1 Interface Details

96(2)




PEM-2 Interface Specification

98(1)




PEEM Salient Points

99(8)




Usage Patterns

99(4)




Expert Topics for PEL

103(1)




Expert Topics for PEM-1

104(1)




Divergent Views and their Resolution

105(2)




Impact of Specifications on the Industry

107(5)




Impact on Service Providers

108(1)




Impact on Vendors

109(1)




Impact on Consumer Market

110(1)




Impact on Corporate Market

111(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

112(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

112(1)




Summary

113(2)




Utilization of IMS in OMA

115(10)




Are Those Specifications Really Needed?

116(1)




Standard Precursors to IMSinOMA

117(1)




Architecture Overview

117(3)




Salient Points and Divergent Views

120(2)




Impact of Specifications

122(1)




Impact on the Industry

122(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

122(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

123(1)




Summary

123(2)




Service Architectures - Parlay and the OSE

125(10)




A Quick Taster of Parlay

125(3)




Parlay X

126(2)




The Parlay in OSE Enabler

128(3)




Parlay as Network Resource

129(1)




Parlay X Web Service as the Enabler

129(1)




Parlay Service Capability Feature as the Enabler

130(1)




Hybrid Parlay and OMA Solution

130(1)




PIOSE Challenges

131(2)




Enforcing Service Provider Policies

131(1)




The Parlay Policy Management Service Capability Feature

132(1)




Impact of Specifications on the Industry

133(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

133(1)




Summary

133(2)




A Web Services Technology Realization of the OSE

135(24)




Web Services Crash Course

136(1)




A Web Services Infrastructure Framework

137(2)




Mobile Web Services

139(1)




The Mobile Network as Content Source for the Web Service

139(1)




The Mobile Device as Web Service Requestor

139(1)




The Mobile Device as Web Service Provider

140(1)




The OMA Web Services Enabler Release

140(2)




The Technologies Specified by OWSER

142(4)




Transport

142(1)




Messaging

143(1)




Description

144(1)




Quality of Service

145(1)




Components

145(1)




Discovery

146(1)




Network Identity

146(7)




Identity Management Concepts Overview

146(2)




Identity Provider Introduction

148(1)




Identity Federation and Single Sign-On

149(1)




Name Registration

149(1)




Authentication Context

150(1)




Single Sign-Out

150(1)




Federation Termination Notification

150(1)




Attribute Query and/or Modification

150(1)




Usage Directive

151(1)




Interaction Service

151(1)




Bootstrapping Identity based Web Services Framework

151(1)




Discovery Service

151(1)




Liberty enabled User Agent

152(1)




Security

152(1)




Network Identity Conclusions

152(1)




OWSER and the OSE

153(1)




Divergent Views and their Resolution

154(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

154(3)




Web Services on Devices

155(1)




XML Usage Guide

155(1)




Common XML Dictionary

155(1)




Additional WS-I Profiles

155(1)




Other Industry Profiles

156(1)




Impact of the Specifications

157(1)




Impact on the Industry

157(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

157(1)




Summary

157(2)




The OMA Service Provider Environment Enabler

159(18)




Are Those Specifications Really Needed?

160(1)




OSPE Use Cases

161(2)




OSPE Requirements

163(1)




Standard Precursors to OSPE

164(3)




OAM & P Standards in the Telecommunications Industry

164(1)




OAM & P Standards in the It Industry

165(2)




OSPE Architecture and Technical Specifications

167(5)




OSPE Enabler in the OSE

167(1)




OSPE Logical Architecture

168(1)




OSPE Logical Flows

169(3)




OSPE Salient Points

172(1)




Impact of Specifications on the Industry

173(2)




Impact on Service Providers

174(1)




Impact on Vendors

174(1)




Impact on Consumer Market

174(1)




Impact on Corporate Market

175(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

175(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

175(1)




Summary

175(2)




The Security Enablers

177(16)




Are Those Specifications Really Needed?

179(1)




Wireless Public Key Infrastructure

180(1)




On-board Key Generation (OBKG)

180(1)




Online Certificate Status Protocol Mobile Profile

180(1)




Smart Card Web Server (SCWS)

180(1)




Security Common Functions Enabler

180(8)




SEC-CF Use Case

181(1)




Security Common Functions Requirements

182(1)




Standards Precursors to Security Common Functions

182(1)




SEC-CF Architecture and Technical Specifications

182(4)




SEC-CF Technical Specifications

186(2)




SEC-CF Salient Points

188(1)




Divergent Views and their Resolution

189(1)




Impact of Specifications on the Industry

189(3)




Impact on Service Providers

190(1)




Impact on Vendors

190(1)




Impact on Consumer Market

191(1)




Impact on Corporate Market

191(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

191(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

192(1)




Summary

192(1)




Part III Selected OMA Service Enablers

193(234)




The Presence and List Management Enablers

195(22)




Presence - What is it?

195(1)




A Constructionist View of Presence Architectures

196(9)




Basic Elements

196(1)




Presence Service Interfaces and the Resource List Server

197(1)




Presence Authorization Policies

198(1)




Presence-related Event Packages

199(1)




Presence Optimizations

199(1)




Presence Standards

200(1)




The `Three-Layer Brick'Model

200(1)




The IETF Presence Model and Standards

201(1)




A Summary of IETF Presence Standards

202(1)




The 3GPP2 Presence Model and Standard

202(1)




The 3GPP Presence Model and Standards

203(1)




The OSA PAM SCF Model

204(1)




The OMA Presence Model and Specifications

205(8)




Presence. XDM. and IMPS Enablers in the OSE

205(1)




Wireless Village and OMA Instant Messaging and Presence Service

205(2)




OMA Presence SIMPLE

207(2)




OMA XML Document Management

209(4)




A Deployment Example - Deploying Presence and XDM Enablers in an IMS or MMD environment

213(2)




Impact of Specifications on the Industry

215(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

215(1)




Summary

215(2)




The Push-to-talk over Cellular Enabler

217(20)




Are Those Specifications Really Needed?

218(1)




Standard Precursors to OMA Push-to-talk over Cellular

218(1)




Architecture and Technical Specifications Overview

219(14)




PoC V1.0 Architecture and Functional Description

219(8)




Enhancements for PoC V2.0 in Architecture and Functionality

227(6)




Salient Points

233(1)




Impact of Specifications on the Industry

233(1)




Impact on Service Providers, Vendors, Consumer, and Corporate Market

233(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

234(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

234(1)




Summary

234(3)




Mobile E-mail

237(14)




Background

237(6)




Market Drivers

239(1)




The Standards Landscape

240(3)




MEM Architecture

243(7)




Analysis

243(2)




Data Synchronization (DS) Realization

245(2)




LEMONADE Realization

247(3)




Summary

250(1)




The Charging Enabler

251(18)




Are Those Specifications Really Needed?

252(1)




Standards Precursors to Charging

253(2)




Mobile Commerce Four Party Model

253(1)




Convergence of Financial, IT, and Telephony Aspects of the Charging Enabler

254(1)




Influence from Other Standards

255(1)




Charging Requirements

255(1)




Charging Architecture and Technical Specifications

255(10)




The Charging Enabler in the OSE

256(1)




Charging Logical Architecture

256(2)




Charging Logical Flows

258(3)




Charging Enabler Technical Specifications

261(4)




Divergent Views and Their Resolution

265(1)




Impact of Specifications on the Industry

265(1)




Impact on Service Providers

266(1)




Impact on Vendors

266(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

266(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

266(1)




Summary

267(2)




The Device Management Enablers

269(20)




Device Management Requirements

271(1)




Device Management Architecture

271(9)




DM in the OMA Service Environment

271(1)




Generic DM Architecture - Components and Interfaces

272(1)




Initial Provisioning

273(1)




OMA Device Management Architecture

274(2)




Bootstrapping

276(1)




The DM Protocol

276(1)




The Management Tree

277(1)




Management Commands

278(1)




Client Responses and Alerts

279(1)




Aggregate Management Operations

279(1)




Configuration Data Storage Models

280(1)




Device Management Enabler Specifications

280(6)




History

281(1)




OMA Client Provisioning

281(1)




OMA Device Management

282(1)




Domain-specific Device Management Enablers

282(4)




Impact of DM Specifications on the Industry

286(1)




Impact on Service Providers

286(1)




Impact on Vendors

287(1)




Impact on Consumer Market

287(1)




Impact on Corporate Market

287(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

287(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

287(1)




Summary

288(1)




The Digital Rights Management Enabler

289(14)




What Were the Drivers for Those Specifications?

290(1)




Are Those Specifications Really Necessary?

291(3)




Basic Download

292(1)




Multiple Device Usage

292(1)




Super-distribution (Peer-to-Peer Sharing)

293(1)




Preview

293(1)




Buying the Rights Object for another User

293(1)




Streaming Content

293(1)




Backup and Restore

293(1)




Export of Rights Object

293(1)




OMA DRM Requirements

294(1)




Types of Content

294(1)




Rights Objects

294(1)




Content and Rights Object Delivery

294(1)




Streaming

294(1)




Enhanced Security

295(1)




Export of Rights Object

295(1)




Super-distribution

295(1)




Backup and Storage

295(1)




Architecture and Technical Specifications Overview

295(2)




Salient Points

297(1)




Divergent Views and Their Resolution

297(1)




Impact of Specifications on the Industry

298(3)




Impact on Service Providers

298(1)




Impact on Vendors

299(1)




Impact on Consumer Market

299(1)




Impact on Corporate Market

300(1)




Impact on other Specifications

300(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

301(1)




Summary

302(1)




The Broadcast Enabler

303(18)




Are Those Specifications Really Needed?

304(1)




Standards Precursors to BCAST Enabler

305(1)




BCAST Architecture

306(13)




BCAST Logical Architecture (Reference Points)

307(1)




BCAST Enabler Functions and Interfaces

308(11)




Impact of Specifications

319(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

320(1)




Summary

320(1)




The Dynamic Content Delivery Enabler

321(16)




Why Do We Need New Specifications for DCD?

322(3)




DCD Use Cases

323(2)




Standards Precursors to DCD

325(1)




DCD Architecture and Technical Specifications

325(3)




DCD in the OMA Service Environment

325(1)




DCD Logical Architecture

326(2)




DCD Technical Specifications

328(1)




DCD Deployment Options

328(4)




A DCD Deployment Example

329(1)




A DCD Service Example

330(2)




DCD Salient Points

332(1)




Impact of Specifications on the Industry

333(2)




Impact on Service Providers

333(1)




Impact on Content Providers

333(1)




Impact on Application Developers

334(1)




Impact on Vendors

334(1)




Impact on Consumer Market

334(1)




Impact on Corporate Market

335(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

335(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

335(1)




Summary

335(2)




The Global Permissions Management Enabler

337(14)




Are Those Specifications Really Needed?

338(4)




GPM Actors and Main Concepts in the Requirements Document

339(1)




A Typical GPM Flow

340(2)




Management of Permissions Rule

342(1)




Standards Precursors to GPM

342(1)




GPM Architecture and Technical Specifications

343(4)




GPM in the OSE

343(1)




GPM Logical Architecture

344(2)




Logical Flows for GPM

346(1)




GPM Technical Specifications

347(1)




GPM Salient Points

347(2)




Impact of Specifications on the Industry

349(1)




Impact on Service Providers

349(1)




Impact on Vendors

349(1)




Impact on Consumer Market

349(1)




Impact on Corporate Market

350(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

350(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

350(1)




Summary

350(1)




The Categorization Based Content Screening Enabler

351(16)




Are Those Specifications Really Needed?

354(2)




Standards Precursors to CBCS

356(1)




CBCS Architecture and Technical Specifications

356(8)




CBCS Enabler in the OSE

357(1)




CBCS Logical Architecture

358(4)




Logical Flows for CBCS

362(2)




CBCS Technical Specifications

364(1)




Impact of Specifications on the Industry

364(2)




Impact on Service Providers

364(1)




Impact on Vendors

365(1)




Impact on Consumer Market

365(1)




Impact on Corporate Market

365(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

365(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

366(1)




Summary

366(1)




The Game Services Enabler

367(14)




Are Those Specifications Really Needed?

368(1)




Standards Precursors to Game Services

369(1)




Game Services Specifications

369(6)




The Gaming Platform

370(1)




Game Services Architecture

371(1)




Game Services --- Client/Server Interface Enabler

372(3)




Impact of Specifications on the Industry

375(2)




Impact on Service Providers

376(1)




Impact on Vendors

376(1)




Impact on Consumer Market

377(1)




Impact on Other Specifications

377(1)




Specifications Evolution and Future Direction

377(2)




Summary

379(2)




The Location Enabler

381(20)




What is Location?

382(1)




Location Architectures

383(4)




Control Plane Location

383(2)




User Plane Location

385(2)




The Mobile Location Services Enabler

387(1)




OMA Mobile Location Protocol

387(1)




OMA Privacy Checking Protocol

387(1)




OMA Roaming Location Protocol

387(1)




The Secure User Plane Location

388(12)




SUPL 1.0 Architecture

389(2)




SUPL 2.0 Architecture

391(2)




SUPL Technical Specifications

393(4)




SUPL Sequence Flow

397(3)




Summary

400(1)




The Mobile Application Environment

401(10)




The Mobile Web Architecture

402(1)




Mobile Browser

403(2)




Precursors

403(1)




OMA Extensions

403(2)




Mobile Content Data Formats

405(2)




vObject

405(1)




SVG for the Mobile Domain

406(1)




SMIL for the Mobile Domain

406(1)




Where Browser and Content Meet

407(1)




Multiple Interaction Modalities and Devices

407(2)




Summary

409(2)




Recent Topics

411(16)




The General Service Subscription Management Enabler

411(3)




Prior Work - Subscription Management

412(1)




New Work - General Service Subscription Management

412(1)




Related Activities

413(1)




Device Profile Evolution

414(2)




Prior Work - Static Properties

414(1)




New Work - Dynamic Properties

415(1)




DPE Examples

415(1)




DPE Related Activities

416(1)




Converged IP Messaging Enabler

416(5)




Multimedia Messaging Service

416(1)




Instant Messaging and Presence Service

417(1)




SIP and IMS introduce SIMPLE Instant Messaging

417(1)




Push-to-Talk over Cellular

418(1)




OMA's Approach to Enablers

418(1)




Converged IP Messaging

418(3)




CPM Summary

421(1)




Mobile Advertising

421(6)




Prior Work - Mobile Advertising Landscape

423(1)




New Work - Mobile Advertising

424(3)




Part IV Conclusions

427(8)




Concluding Remarks, and What's in Store Next?

429(6)




Project Post-mortem

429(1)




What's Next?

430(5)
Annex A435(6)
Abbreviations and Acronyms441(14)
References455(14)
Index469

Fakta