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Dewey's Philosophy of Science

Serie: Synthese Library 421

This monograph presents a unitary account of Dewey's philosophy of science and demonstrates the relevance for contemporary debates. The book is written from a theoretical angle and explains Dewey's via on Experience, Language, Inquiry, Construction and Realism. Les mer
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Om boka

This monograph presents a unitary account of Dewey's philosophy of science and demonstrates the relevance for contemporary debates. The book is written from a theoretical angle and explains Dewey's via on Experience, Language, Inquiry, Construction and Realism. Via taking this route the book addresses key philosophical problems - such as the nature of language, the idea of experience, the notion of logical constructivism, the criticism of representationalism and the nature of scientific practices.
John Dewey (1859-1952) is one of the most representative philosophers of the United States. He is well known for his work in education, psychology and social reform and one of the primary figures associated with the philosophy of pragmatism. His Philosophy of Science underwent a period of almost total unpopularity and neglect. In recent times, however, as a consequence of the strong pragmatist renaissance we are now witnessing, Dewey's philosophy of science has attracted new attention. This book presents for the first time a comprehensive overview of Dewey's philosophy of science and will be of interest to scholars working in nineteenth and twentieth century philosophy of science and on the relationship between Pragmatism and Logical Empiricism.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Introduction
Chapter 1. Experience1.1. The Semantic Identity Thesis1.2. Experience as Life-Behavior1.3. Experience as Method1.4. Forms of Experience
Chapter 2. Language2.1. Language as Activity: A Shift of Paradigm2.2. Significance and Meaning2.3. Semantic Externalism and Practical Agreement2.4. Dewey's Pragmatist Account of Concepts2.5. Common Sense and Scientific Concepts
Chapter 3. Inquiry3.1. The Biological Basis of Inquiry3.2. The Internal Conditions of Inquiry3.3. The Normativity of the Situation3.4. Truth and Warranted Assertibility
Chapter 4. Construction4.1. How are Synthetic Judgments Possible?4.2. The Construction of Evidence4.3. The Constitutive Function of the A Priori4.4. The Construction of Objectivity
Chapter 5. Realism5.1. Reichenbach's Interpretation and Dewey's Reply5.2. Dewey, the Structural Realist5.3. Is Dewey's a Structural Realist?5.4. Dewey's Expressivist Realism

Om forfatteren

Roberto Gronda is Assistant Professor in Philosophy of Science at the University of Pisa. He is currently working on pragmatist philosophy of science, with particular attention to the notion of scientific practice, and on philosophy of expertise.