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The Development of Social Engagement

Neurobiological Perspectives

Peter J. Marshall (Redaktør) ; Nathan A. Fox (Redaktør)

Recent advances in neuroscience have allowed researchers from various disciplines - developmental psychology, comparative psychology, and developmental psychopathology - to shed light on the neural systems involved in social engagement behaviours in both children and adults. Les mer
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Vår pris: 945,-

(Innbundet) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager
På grunn av Brexit-tilpasninger og tiltak for å begrense covid-19 kan det dessverre oppstå forsinket levering.

Om boka

Recent advances in neuroscience have allowed researchers from various disciplines - developmental psychology, comparative psychology, and developmental psychopathology - to shed light on the neural systems involved in social engagement behaviours in both children and adults. The Development of Social Engagement presents the latest on the topic from each of these intersecting research areas. Developmental psychologists have long been interested in the
constellation of behaviours that constitutes early social engagement in infants and young children. Renewed interest in this topic has been sparked by research applying new and innovative techniques to long-standing questions about the development of face processing, joint attention, language, and early social
cognition. These developments have been mirrored by the growth of comparative work concerning the neurobiological correlates and determinants of social engagement behaviours across a range of non-human species. The chapters in this volume bring together work on all of these topics, including questions related to social systems, play, maternal behaviour, and evolutionary concerns. The volume also covers the recent application of rigorous biologically focused research paradigms to the study of
atypical social engagement in children, both in terms of disorders such as autism and Williams Syndrome, and in terms of the effects of adverse early rearing environments (e.g., institutionalism). This book presents some of the latest research on social-engagement processes across a variety of
disciplines that cover a range of life stages and species. It will provide both student and professional researchers with a taste of current research directions in this rapidly expanding field.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

1. Biological Approaches to the Study of Social Engagement ; 2. Temperamental Exuberance: Correlates and Consequences ; 3. Neural Bases of Infants' Processing of Social Information in Faces ; 4. Joint Attention, Social Engagement and the Development of Social Competence ; 5. The Social Dimension in Language Development: A Rich History and a New Frontier ; 6. Neurocognitive Bases of Preschoolers' Theory-of-Mind Development: Integrating Cognitive Neuroscience and Cognitive Development ; 7. The Neurobiology of Social Bonds and Affiliation ; 8. The Neurobiology of Maternal Behaviour in Mammals ; 9. Play and the Development of Social Engagement: A Comparative Perspective ; 10. Evolutionary Perspectives on Social Engagement ; 11. Understanding Impairments in Social Engagement in Autism ; 12. Social Engagements in Williams Syndrome ; 13. The Psychological Effects of Early Institutional Rearing

Om forfatteren

Peter J. Marshall is Assistant Professor of Psychology at Temple University. His research interests include temperament, attachment, and the utility of electrophysical measures of nervous system functioning in research on social, emotional, and cognitive development in infancy and early childhood.LNathan A. Fox is Professor of Human Development at the University of Maryland, College Park. His interests mainly concern the
biological bases of individual differences in infant temperament and the role of early experience as it affects brain and behavior in the realm of social and emotional competencies.