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Advocating for Women with Postpartum Mental Illness

A Guide to Changing the Law and the National Climate

; Barry M. Lewis

Advocating for Women with Postpartum Psychosis takes the reader into the world of one of the most misunderstood mental illnesses. Affecting 1 to 2 out of 1,000 childbearing women a year in the United States, postpartum psychosis creates hallucinations and delusions, which, if untreated, can lead to infanticide and subsequently imprisonment or death for the mother. Les mer
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Vår pris: 466,-

(Paperback) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager
På grunn av Brexit-tilpasninger og tiltak for å begrense covid-19 kan det dessverre oppstå forsinket levering.

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Advocating for Women with Postpartum Psychosis takes the reader into the world of one of the most misunderstood mental illnesses. Affecting 1 to 2 out of 1,000 childbearing women a year in the United States, postpartum psychosis creates hallucinations and delusions, which, if untreated, can lead to infanticide and subsequently imprisonment or death for the mother. While other parts in the world, particularly the United Kingdom have more sympathetic laws, in the United States, women with postpartum psychosis are often stigmatized as "baby killers", and face the ultimate penalty.

Through this book, though, authors Feingold and Lewis humanize the mother's experience to promote understanding and compassion. Beginning with an overview of the mental health and legal facets surrounding postpartum psychosis, the authors then provide vital resources and tools for mental health practitioners and legal professionals to enact change in their practices and communities.

Complete with case studies and the authors' experiences in changing the law in their own state of Illinois, this book is a necessary resource for furthering dialogue and action around maternal mental illness.

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Innholdsfortegnelse

PrefacePrologue (Barry)Introduction (Susan): Explains the importance of understanding postpartum disorders and postpartum psychosis in order to change laws and transform the national climate Part I: Understanding and Treating Women with Postpartum PsychosisChapter 1: Perinatal Mental Illness is a Serious Risk to Women and Families (Susan)Differentiation between postpartum depression and the rare, most serious form of the illness, postpartum psychosis (PPP). An explanation of the signs and symptoms, risk factors and prevalence of various postpartum disorders from the mildest baby blues to postpartum depression and the most severe, postpartum psychosis. Includes information distinguishing the various subtypes of postpartum mood disorders, the most common complication of childbirth, affecting nearly a million sufferers each year.
While PPP is less common than postpartum depression, it accounts for hundreds of infanticides and suicides, many of them notorious. Many are the result of "altruistic infanticides" or "command hallucinations" and there is an urgency to treat this illness as a crisis and an emergency situation to prevent possible dreadful outcomes.Finally give the case in my practice where a phone call by a husband, and my quick response averted a potential tragedy. Chapter 2: The Silence and Stigma that is a Deadly Combination for those with Postpartum Psychosis (Susan)Education and early intervention are critical to prevent catastrophic outcomes. Conversely the caveat in order to have this happen is for the woman and family to disclose signs and symptoms to both healthcare and mental health professionals. Yet the stigma of serious mental health problems and fear of being regarded as a "bad mother" leads to silence which often does not encourage openness but rather a wall of silence and shame. Discuss the poignant story of Cynthia Wachenheim. This chapter is planned to include an interview with her sister, Karen who became an Advocate for PPP and Board Member of Postpartum Support, International.
This is a great case to de-stigmatize women who get PPP, as Cynthia was a brilliant attorney and well-respected lawyer in NYC, who wrote position papers for judges, yet left an incoherent suicide note. Tragically, she strapped her infant child to her chest and jumped from her 8th floor apartment to their mutual intended death. This was to protect her child from a lifetime of suffering from what she believed were his disabilities. These disabilities existed only in her delusional mind. She landed on her back, dead, and the child protected by her mother's dead body suffered only mild injuries.
If Cynthia's family had only understood what was happening to her, that she was having psychotic delusional thoughts about her son, they might have been a

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