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Infotopia

How Many Minds Produce Knowledge

The rise of the "information society" offers not only considerable peril but also great promise Beset from all sides by a never-ending barrage of media, how can we ensure that the most accurate information emerges and is heeded? Cass R. Les mer
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Vår pris: 528,-

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Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager
På grunn av Brexit-tilpasninger og tiltak for å begrense covid-19 kan det dessverre oppstå forsinket levering.

Om boka

The rise of the "information society" offers not only considerable peril but also great promise Beset from all sides by a never-ending barrage of media, how can we ensure that the most accurate information emerges and is heeded? Cass R. Sunstein here develops a deeply optimistic understanding of the human potential to pool information, combat groupthink, and to use that knowledge to improve our lives. New ways, many Internet-based, to share and aggregate
information-including wikis, open-source software, and prediction markets-are helping companies, schools, governments, and individuals not only to acquire, but also to create, ever-growing bodies of accurate knowledge without succumbing to the dangers of a hive-mind mentality. In a world where opinion and
anecdote increasingly compete on equal footing with hard evidence, the on-line effort of many minds coming together could provide the best path to infotopia.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Introduction: Dreams and Nightmares
1: The (Occasional) Power of Numbers
2: The Surprising Failures of Deliberating Groups
3: Four Big Problems
4: Money, Prices, and Prediction Markets
5: Many Working Minds: Wikis, Open Source Software, and Blogs
6: Implications and Reforms
Conclusion--Realizing Promises
Appendix: Prediction Markets
Notes
Index

Om forfatteren

Cass R. Sunstein is Karl N. Llewellyn Distinguished Service Professor of Jurisprudence at the University of Chicago Law School, a contributing editor at the New Republic and the American Prospect, and a frequent contributor as well to such publications as the New York Times and the Washington Post. He is the recipient of the Henderson Prize and the Goldsmith Book Prize; his many books include Radicals in Robes, Republic.com, Why Societies Need
Dissent, and Designing Democracy: What Constitutions Do. He lives in Chicago, Illinois.