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Projecting Tomorrow - 
      Prof James Chapman
    
      Nicholas J. Cull

Projecting Tomorrow

Science Fiction and Popular Cinema

; Nicholas J. Cull

Cinema and science fiction were made for each other. The science fiction genre has produced some of the most extraordinary films ever made, yet science fiction cinema is about more than just special effects. Les mer
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Paperback
Legg i
Vår pris: 373,-

(Paperback) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager

Cinema and science fiction were made for each other. The science fiction genre has produced some of the most extraordinary films ever made, yet science fiction cinema is about more than just special effects. This exploration of the genre examines landmark science fiction films from the 1930s onwards.
FAKTA
Utgitt:
Forlag: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Innbinding: Paperback
Språk: Engelsk
Sider: 256
ISBN: 9781780764108
Format: 23 x 16 cm
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SERIE:
VURDERING
Gi vurdering
Les vurderinger
Acknowledgements
List of Illustrations
Introduction
Dry Future: Just Imagine (1930)
The Prophet and the Showman: Things to Come (1936)
Screening Wells for Cold War America: The War of the Worlds (1953)
The British Invasions: The Quatermass Experiment (1955), Quatermass 2 (1957) and Quatermass and the Pit (1967)
Sex and the Single Robot: Forbidden Planet (1956)
The Watershed: 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
Monkey Business: Planet of the Apes (1968)
Stretching the Genre: The Hellstrom Chronicle (1971)
Future Imperfect: Logan's Run (1976)
No Time for Sorrows: Star Wars (1977)
Rustbelt Messiah: RoboCop (1987)
The Image as Hero: Avatar (2009)

Afterword
Filmography
Index
James Chapman is Professor of Film Studies at the University of Leicester, UK. His previous books include The British at War: Cinema, State and Propaganda, 1939-1945(1998), and Licence To Thrill: A Cultural History of the James Bond Films (2nd edn 2007), both from I.B.Tauris. He is editor of the Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television. Nicholas J. Cull is Professor of Public Diplomacy in the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. His previous books include The Cold War and the United States Information Agency: American Propaganda and Public Diplomacy, 1945-1989(2008) and (with James Chapman), Projecting Empire: Imperialism and Popular Cinema (I.B.Tauris, 2009). He is president of the International Association for Media and History.