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Boo! Culture, Experience, and the Startle Reflex

It is quite common to reflect on what startles you. In the most diverse social contexts and cultures, the inescapable physiology of the reflex both shapes the experience of startle and biases the social usage to which the reflex is put. Les mer
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Vår pris: 945,-

(Innbundet) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager
På grunn av Brexit-tilpasninger og tiltak for å begrense covid-19 kan det dessverre oppstå forsinket levering.

Om boka

It is quite common to reflect on what startles you. In the most diverse social contexts and cultures, the inescapable physiology of the reflex both shapes the experience of startle and biases the social usage to which the reflex is put. This book describes the ways in which the reflex is experienced, culturally elaborated, and socially used, and offers explanations for both patterned commonalities found across cultures, and for the culture-typical differences which
differing cultural systems engender.

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Innholdsfortegnelse

PART I: STARTLE AND HYPERSTARTLE ; Introduction ; 1. Startle as a Personal Experience and as a Social Resource ; 2. Making People Jumpy: Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn Create a Hyperstartler ; 3. Variations on a Theme: Being Startled Makes One Ill ; 4. The Startle Museum I: Exhibits of Startle Sorted by their Expository Uses ; 5. The Startle Museum II: Exhibits of Startle Sorted by Properties of Startle Events ; PART II: LATAH AND OTHER STARTLE-MATCHING SYNDROMES ; 6. Attention Capture and the Startle-Matching Syndromes ; 7. Latah: The Paradigmatic Startle-Matching Syndrome ; 8. Explaining Latah: The Importance of Descriptive Detail ; 9. The Startle-Matching Syndrome in Other Cultures ; 10. Culture, Biology, and Individual Experience

Om forfatteren

Ronald C. Simons is Professor of Psychiatry and Adjunct Professor of Anthropology at Michigan State University, and Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington.