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Women and the Book Trade in Sixteenth-Century France

«'This is an extraordinary, comprehensive study of women's involvement in sixteenth-century publication - within the printing trade, as authors of manuscripts, and as writers. Broomhall gives us a vivid panorama of women's involvement in the trade, constantly illuminating how the themes and material conditions of women's writing were linked. Her subtle study brings to life the constraints and the possibilities that sixteenth-century French society allowed women. This is indeed a remarkable book.' Lyndal Roper, Royal Holloway College, University of London, UK 'Susan Broomhall’s book gives us a full and fascinating picture of women as authors and publishers in 16th-century France. From the famous to the little-known, these writers found ways to get around the silence enjoined on women and clever techniques to say what they wanted to say. Broomhall gives lively recreation of their world and of the women and men who read them.' Natalie Zemon Davis, Princeton University, and author of The Return of Martin Guerre '... a compelling book.' H-France '... a ground-breaking work indispensable not only for historians of the book but also for anyone interested in the lives of working women during the sixteenth century.' Parergon 'This scholar's researches have been original and extensive and are to be highly commended.' BHR 'Using a wide variety of sources - from the most celebrated female authors to heretofore unknowns - this is an original contribution to the burgeoning field of the history of the book.' Sixteenth Century Journal '... a welcome addition to both literary and gender studies, as well as to print history. Previous studies of female writers have tended to concentrate on the 'content' of women's writing, but Broomhall sets herself the task of examining the 'context' and conditions of female participation in the book trade. This volume offers an in-depth analysis of women not only as authors but also as readers, printers, editors, patrons, scribes, collector»

Explores how women's participation in publication culture in the period from the introduction of print medium in Paris to the end of the 16th century differed from that of men. The author explores the particular contexts and strategies of the work and focuses on thematic issues. Les mer

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Explores how women's participation in publication culture in the period from the introduction of print medium in Paris to the end of the 16th century differed from that of men. The author explores the particular contexts and strategies of the work and focuses on thematic issues.

Detaljer

Forlag
Routledge
Innbinding
Innbundet
Språk
Engelsk
Sider
290
ISBN
9780754606710
Utgivelsesår
2002
Format
23 x 15 cm

Om forfatteren

Susan Broomhall is an Australian Research Council Post-doctoral Fellow in the Department of History, The University of Western Australia. She has published on early modern women in the Sixteenth Century Journal, Social History of Medicine, Nottingham French Studies, Parergon amongst others and her second monograph Gender and Medical Knowledge in Early Modern France is forthcoming from Manchester University Press. She is currently working on a modern edition of the Le Verger Fertile des Vertus and a history of women in sixteenth-century France with Colette H. Winn, a study of the correspondence of the daughters of Guillaume d'Orange, and a monograph entitled Writing Convent Life in Sixteenth-Century France: The Abbey of Beaumont-Lès-Tours

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«'This is an extraordinary, comprehensive study of women's involvement in sixteenth-century publication - within the printing trade, as authors of manuscripts, and as writers. Broomhall gives us a vivid panorama of women's involvement in the trade, constantly illuminating how the themes and material conditions of women's writing were linked. Her subtle study brings to life the constraints and the possibilities that sixteenth-century French society allowed women. This is indeed a remarkable book.' Lyndal Roper, Royal Holloway College, University of London, UK 'Susan Broomhall’s book gives us a full and fascinating picture of women as authors and publishers in 16th-century France. From the famous to the little-known, these writers found ways to get around the silence enjoined on women and clever techniques to say what they wanted to say. Broomhall gives lively recreation of their world and of the women and men who read them.' Natalie Zemon Davis, Princeton University, and author of The Return of Martin Guerre '... a compelling book.' H-France '... a ground-breaking work indispensable not only for historians of the book but also for anyone interested in the lives of working women during the sixteenth century.' Parergon 'This scholar's researches have been original and extensive and are to be highly commended.' BHR 'Using a wide variety of sources - from the most celebrated female authors to heretofore unknowns - this is an original contribution to the burgeoning field of the history of the book.' Sixteenth Century Journal '... a welcome addition to both literary and gender studies, as well as to print history. Previous studies of female writers have tended to concentrate on the 'content' of women's writing, but Broomhall sets herself the task of examining the 'context' and conditions of female participation in the book trade. This volume offers an in-depth analysis of women not only as authors but also as readers, printers, editors, patrons, scribes, collector»

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