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Rejecting Retributivism

Free Will, Punishment, and Criminal Justice

Caruso argues against retributivism and develops an alternative for addressing criminal behavior that is ethically defensible and practical. Les mer
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Vår pris: 1435,-

(Innbundet) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager

Om boka

Caruso argues against retributivism and develops an alternative for addressing criminal behavior that is ethically defensible and practical.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Acknowledgments; 1. Free will, legal punishment, and retributivism; 2. Free will skepticism: hard incompatibilism and hard luck; 3. The epistemic argument against retributivism; 4. Additional reasons for rejecting retributivism; 5. Consequentialist, educational, and mixed theories of punishment; 6. Public health-quarantine model I: a non-retributive approach to criminal behavior; 7. Public health-quarantine model II: the social determinants of health & criminal behavior; 8. Public health-quarantine model iii: human dignity, victims' rights, rehabilitation, and preemptive incapacitation; 9. Public health-quarantine model IV: funishment, deterrence, evidentiary standards, and indefinite detention; References; Index.

Om forfatteren

Gregg D. Caruso is Professor of Philosophy at SUNY Corning and Honorary Professor of Philosophy at Macquarie University. He is also the Co-Director of the Justice Without Retribution Network (JWRN) at the University of Aberdeen School of Law. His research interests include free will, agency, and responsibility, as well as philosophy of mind, cognitive science, neuroethics, moral psychology, criminal law, punishment, and public policy. His books include Just Deserts: Debating Free Will (with Daniel C. Dennett, 2021), Free Will and Consciousness: A Determinist Account of the Illusion of Free Will (2012), Exploring the Illusion of Free Will and Moral Responsibility (2013), Science and Religion: 5 Questions (2014), Neuroexistentialism: Meaning, Morals, and Purpose in the Age of Neuroscience (co-edited with Owen Flanagan), and Free Will Skepticism in Law and Society (co-edited with Elizabeth Shaw and Derk Pereboom).