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Augustine and Wittgenstein - 
      Kim Paffenroth
    
      Alexander R. Eodice
    
      John Doody
    
      Myles Burnyeat
    
      Kim Paffenroth
    
      Brian R. Clack
    
      Espen Dahl
    
      Chad Engelland
    
      Alexander R. Eodice
    
      David Goodill, Blackfriars, University of Oxford, UK
    
      Garry Hagberg
    
      Miles Hollingworth
    
      Erika Kidd
    
      Duncan Richter
    
      Caleb Thompson

Augustine and Wittgenstein

Kim Paffenroth (Redaktør) ; Alexander R. Eodice (Redaktør) ; John Doody (Redaktør) ; Myles Burnyeat (Innledning) ; Kim Paffenroth (Innledning) ; Brian R. Clack (Innledning) ; Espen Dahl (Innledning) ; Chad Engelland (Innledning) ; Alexander R. Eodice (Innledning) ; David Goodill, Blackfriars, University of Oxford, UK (Innledning) ; Garry Hagberg (Innledning) ; Miles Hollingworth (Innledning) ; Erika Kidd (Innledning) ; Duncan Richter (Innledning) ; Caleb Thompson (Innledning)

«<p>This wide-ranging and provocative collection of essays highlights the many connections between Augustine and Wittgenstein on language, memory, confession, and religion. While it was W. himself who said that A. was one of his favorite writers (along with Kierkegaard and Dostoevsky), exactly why that is so and how that admiration expresses itself in his writing has never before been so clearly and broadly presented as in this collection. I found myself understanding better each author through the other. This book is a must read for anyone interested in either of these deeply original and profoundly personal thinkers, or simply in thinking about the eternal questions that they raise. </p>»

This collection examines the relationship between Augustine and Wittgenstein and demonstrates the deep affinity they share, not only for the substantive issues they treat but also for the style of philosophizing they employ. Les mer
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This collection examines the relationship between Augustine and Wittgenstein and demonstrates the deep affinity they share, not only for the substantive issues they treat but also for the style of philosophizing they employ. Wittgenstein saw certain salient Augustinian approaches to concepts like language-learning, will, memory, and time as prompts for his own philosophical explorations, and he found great inspiration in Augustine's highly personalized and interlocutory style of writing philosophy. Each in his own way, in an effort to understand human experience more fully, adopts a mode of philosophizing that involves questioning, recognizing confusions, and confronting doubts. Beyond its bearing on such topics as language, meaning, knowledge, and will, their analysis extends to the nature of religious belief and its fundamental place in human experience. The essays collected here consider a broad range of themes, from issues regarding teaching, linguistic meaning, and self-understanding to miracles, ritual, and religion.
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Forlag: Lexington Books
Innbinding: Paperback
Språk: Engelsk
ISBN: 9781498585286
Format: 22 x 15 cm
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«<p>This wide-ranging and provocative collection of essays highlights the many connections between Augustine and Wittgenstein on language, memory, confession, and religion. While it was W. himself who said that A. was one of his favorite writers (along with Kierkegaard and Dostoevsky), exactly why that is so and how that admiration expresses itself in his writing has never before been so clearly and broadly presented as in this collection. I found myself understanding better each author through the other. This book is a must read for anyone interested in either of these deeply original and profoundly personal thinkers, or simply in thinking about the eternal questions that they raise. </p>»

«<p>This excellent collection of essays is poised to become the standard first resource for scholars and students examining connections between Augustine and Wittgenstein. These ten essays (one classic and nine newly written for the volume) address a diverse set of problems linking the two thinkers, including Wittgenstein’s interpretation of Augustine, the role of ostention in language learning, difficulties concerning meaningful speech about ultimate reality, the perception and interpretation of miracles, human sexuality and the ritual imagination, the origins of religiosity, the relation between time and memory, and understanding the recalcitrant will. The collection provides a much needed scholarly resource for those interested in Wittgenstein’s relation to Augustine as well as creative and critical examination of links and divergences between the two philosophers.</p>»

«<p>Wittgenstein, who thought religiously but not from within a religion, had, to say the least, a complex debt to Augustine, whose surprisingly unsettled religiosity still manages to disturb the peace of a secular aesthetic. The ten essays that comprise Augustine and Wittgenstein stake out the terms of their arresting conjunction in inventive ways. There is no single paradigm of approach that the writers follow: along the way, we get manicured lawns, hot-house flowers, wild germinations, and ambiguous weeds. This is philosophy at the edge of reverence. Dig in.</p>»

Chapter1. Wittgenstein and Augustine De Magistro
Chapter2. Learning by Ostension in Augustine and Wittgenstein
Chapter3. In the Beginning: Wittgenstein Reads Augustine
Chapter4. The Swine and the Chatterbox
Chapter5. Wittgenstein, Ritual, and "St. Augustine's Attitude to Sex"
Chapter6. Wittgenstein and Augustine on Seeing Miracles
Chapter7. Original Sense: Augustine and Wittgenstein on Religion and Origins
Chapter8. Wittgenstein, Augustine, and the Content of Memory
Chapter9. Time and freedom in the Confessions and the Tractatus
Chapter10. Augustine and Wittgenstein on the Will
Kim Paffenroth is professor of religious studies and the director of the Honors Program at Iona College.

John Doody is professor of philosophy and Robert M. Birmingham chair in humanities
at Villanova University.

Alexander R. Eodice is professor of philosophy and chair of the Philosophy Department at Iona College.